Home » News » Baby Audio Crystalline 1.3 out now – with RTO option

We hope you’re busy making music out there. Here’s a quick distraction, but we think your tracks will like it!

Crystalline has been updated to a new and improved 1.3, out today via all our regular channels. (Changelog below). Furthermore, the new update has been picked up by Splice for release under their popular Rent-To-Own program. 

Splice RTO customers can pay for Crystalline in 20 monthly installments of $4.95 each with the option to cancel anytime. When you’ve paid off the full amount, you own the plugin forever – and there are no hidden fees. A fair and square deal.

Get Crystalline via Splice RTO HERE.  

What’s new in version 1.3

  Preset library updated to organize by purpose/instrument as requested by many users.

 “Crackling bug” fixed in the Transients feature. Now replaced with an improved parameter called “Warp”, which lets you shape how the reverb responds to transients – and shift the emphasis toward attack or release.

 Improved reverse function.

 Various graphical and performance updates.

Update now or try the demo

If you own Crystalline, you can get the 1.3 update for free right here by clicking the download links below. Non-owners can use the same links to demo the plugin. So go ahead, take it for a spin – and see what a crystal clean reverb can do to your mixes.

 

Download Crystalline 1.3:

GET MAC VERSION // GET PC VERSION

 

A modern studio reverb

Crystalline is a new, state-of-the-art, reverb plugin with a lush and pristine sound. It gives you unprecedented creative control to shape the reverb space and lets you sync reverb start and decay times to your song’s bpm.

 

GO TO CRYSTALLINE

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