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“I just make sure that the sound that is being recorded is as close to the sound I want as possible. I don’t want to rely on the engineers to monkey around with the eq afterwards—unless it’s an effect that you’re trying to get.”- Leon Redbone

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Current Tape Reviews

Megan
 
Artist Name:
Matt Mercado
  Title:
Megan
 
Date Posted:
November 2011
 
Genre:
Rock and Pop
Equipment Used:

Pentium 4 PC with two MOTU 2408 Mk3 interfaces running Steinberg Cubase 4. Mics: RODE NT1-A (vocals, drum overheads, acoustic guitars), AKG D112 (kick), Shure SM57 (snare top), Shure PL 10 (toms) and PL20 (floor tom). Taylor 710ce and Seagull S6 acoustic guitars; Modulus bass input direct.

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Production Notes & Credits:

"Megan" is a male vocal rock song. Matt wrote, recorded and produced the track. The band was Matt on guitar, bass and vocals, Quinn Moor on guitar, and Ithan Novak on drums.

Reviewed By: Marty Peters
Rating: 4
Ah, a little classic folk rock. Matt's Wallflowers-styled track is full of nifty little surprises and is a fine recording for the most part. The drum performance and tones are first-rate, as is the bass. Better still are the Hammond organ and Rhodes piano sections. Since no source of origin was given in the equipment list, we are unsure whether the guys actually recorded the real instruments or used virtual sound sources, but either way, they sound great.

Our only concern with the track centers around the acoustic guitars. Both the six and twelve string guitars sound thin to our ears and the overuse of them in the intro adds some confusion to an otherwise tidy recording.

Suggestions: As the proud owner of several Taylor guitars I can testify to their clean, articulate tone. That said, no one will ever confuse them with a Martin or Gibson Dreadnought when it comes to low end presence. However, with some careful mic placement and judicious eq, it is certainly possible to achieve a big bold tone using one of these beauties. Experimentation is the key here, and what you learn now will be invaluable in future endeavors. As for the log jam in the intro, remember that less can truly be more and leaving room for your track to expand can be a good thing.

Summary: The devil is in the details.

Contact: Matt Mercado, sonicpalace@comcast.net
About: Marty Peters

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