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Most difficult instrument to record?






Current Tape Reviews

 
Artist Name:
Jody David Taylor
  Title:
Bones Along The Road
 
Date Posted:
December 2009
 
Genre:
Country
Equipment Used:

TASCAM DP01FXCD digital recorder, AKG Perception 100 condenser mic, Audio-Technica AT2021 condenser mic, Alesis Midiverb II, Zoom G2 guitar processor, ART Tube MP preamp, M-Audio Studiophile BX5a monitors, Fender Telecaster and Precision bass, Regal resonator guitar, Yamaha DTXPLORER electronic drum kit, Yamaha DGX305 keyboard.

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Production Notes & Credits:

“Bones Along the Road” is a male vocal country song. Jody wrote, performed, and recorded the track in his home studio.

Reviewed By: Marty Peters
Rating: 3
Recording: Jody has submitted a very fine effort with “Bones Along the Road”, and the fact that it was done on an 8-track machine makes it even more impressive. The drums have a nice organic feel, the lead and harmony vocals are delivered without sibilance or overcompression, and the bass is nice and full in its support role. We also found the ambience on the Fender Telecaster to be very effective. This is certainly one of those cases where a recording musician has realized or exceeded the potential of his/her gear list!

Now for the caveat. While we personally admire the “organic” feel to Jody’s recording, there are times when these types of mixes feel like they lack a bit of “glue”, and that is the case here to our ears. The good news is that the issue can be resolved with a touch of professional mastering.

Suggestions: Mastering is one of the most crucial and misunderstood facets of our industry. In the right hands it the final step in the long creative process of recording. In the wrong hands, however, it can be the ruination of hours and hours of hard work, time and money. With the advent of computer-based recording and the rise of the home and project studio market, many of us have added mastering to our list of “skills”. After all, there are literally dozens of software programs as well as several hardware units available to do the job.

So why then are we suggesting to Jody that he seek out “professional” mastering for his project? Well, a dedicated mastering engineer is a specialist. His/her equipment is specific to the job, as are the monitors, room acoustics and most importantly the education and experience required to do the job correctly. In Jody’s case, “gluing” his mix together will require some proper compression/limiting, and this is a talent that is not to be underestimated!

To that end, should Jody decide to heed our advice we would encourage him to do a bit of research and find several mastering houses that have worked on releases that he admires in this genre. The general assumption that these facilities are financially beyond reach to us mere mortals is not necessarily the case, particularly in these tough economic times.

Summary: Grab the glue gun!

Contact: Jody David Taylor, Lumberman@hughes.net

About: Marty Peters

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