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“I think working at home is the perfect environment for being creative, but at the same time, if you’re not careful, you can become too much of a perfectionist... I spend hours and hours sitting here working on one mix, only to find myself starting all over again the next day.”- Blues Saraceno of Poison

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Current Tape Reviews

Strangerland
 
Artist Name:
Stuart A. Kirk
  Title:
Strangerland
 
Date Posted:
February 2009
 
Genre:
Rock and Pop
Equipment Used:

PC running Cakewalk SONAR and Sony Sound Forge (mastering), Edirol 2496 interface, Seide PC-M1D 48V mic (vocals), Reason soundfonts (bass/trumpets/synth sounds), Yamaha CBX-K1 MIDI keyboard, Les Paul Gibson and Digitech RP2000 guitar modelling effector (backing and lead guitars), digital loops and sounds for percussion, mixed and mastered through Yamaha MSP3 speakers.

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Production Notes & Credits:

“Strangerland” is a male vocal rock song with a moody, landscaped feeling. Stuart wrote, performed, mixed and mastered it all.

Reviewed By: Marty Peters
Rating: 2
Recording: For our money, Stuart has done a fine job in recreating a classic ‘60s/’70s Moody Blues/Procol Harm vibe. The recipe includes predominant strings, slightly buried vocals, rather weak bass guitar, and a very loud and in-your-face, fuzzed out lead guitar solo. If this was Stuart’s intention, we give him an A for his efforts. If, however, this was not his intention, then we would point out that his mix is suffering from some rather glaring balance issues! Interesting situation, eh? Since our mission here is to provide insight into the recording process we will assume the latter...

Suggestions: As Frank Zappa once said, “Learn all you can about the guitar and then forget it.” In Stuart’s case we would encourage him to go back and rebalance his mix. Try turning up the vocals and bass guitar, place the strings in a more supportive role further back, and reduce the volume of the lead guitar. Now take pause and decide if these changes suit your artistic vision. If so—great. If not—change them back to their original state, all the while retaining the knowledge that you gained by the redo.

Summary: Lots of good stuff to work with here. You may begin!

Contact: Stuart A. Kirk, kirksmj@seaple.icc.ne.jp.

About: Marty Peters

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